Tag Archives: pvc

2017: Towards a Clear and Vertical Fabric Architecture

It’s time to look back on the year that was. And some thoughts on the year to come.

In the fabric structure industry here in the USA, two major projects caught my eye: Viking Stadium in Minneapolis, MN and the Stadiums at the US Open in Flushing Meadows, NY.

vikingstadiumta-597187860To the general public, the roof of the new Viking Stadium looks like a typical glass skylight but just the idea of watching a sporting event in a temperature controlled environment yet still being able to see the sky is what will become common in the future.

ETFE is the word of the year and a close second is transparency.

063471_013Designers will see new potential for mall renovations, airports, transit stations just to name a few. Developers and users will insist their traveling and shopping experience never be rained out. For those of us that want to look small, look no further to outdoor school areas, home extensions and public plazas to have “clear” roofs.

To see and be seen.

arthur-ashe-stadium-debut-retractable-roof-2016-us-tennis-open-01The US Open Tennis Facility in NY showed the sports world here in the US that a retractable roofs is no longer an option but a necessity. Is Met Life Stadium next?

It may look like a smaller version of the Dallas Cowboy stadium roof but it works in an urban context. The upcoming Atlanta Falcons Stadium roof will show case the retractable roof as an iconic piece of the Architecture in the city.

rossetti_usta_gs_792_0Another upcoming necessity will be the textile facade like seen at the Bille Jean King Court a the US Open. The facade will be seen more in convention building types. Old and new sports facilities will be wearing temporary or permanent coats. Designed using parametric equations and fluid dynamics or just plain and simple, these new facades will be ever changing billboards, climates changers and visual jewelry for buildings of all shapes and sizes from offices to warehouses to industrial buildings.

And “textile facades” work small too. They can screen mechanical systems, parking garages and a neighbor in style.

The Sky’s the limit and so is the horizon in 2017.

Have a Happy New Year!

Advertisements

Fabric Structure Samplings

Christo and Jeanne Claude's Wrapped Reichstag, 1995Picking the right fabric can be the key to everything.

We all know what a piece of wood, brick or glass feels like.

We can go outside and find an example pretty quickly.

What about fabric?

We can look at an awning or tent or think about our umbrella or jacket.

When you start thinking about building a structure out of fabric that provides, shade, last a long time and that you can apply graphics to (just to name a few), there are plenty of different fabrics to choose from.

How do you start?

Here’s my suggestion (if I forgot a manufacturer, let me know):

PTFE (30 year life span, Class A non-combustible fabric, permanent)

Saint Gobain, Chukoh, Verseidag, Taconic, Obeikan, Sefar

PVC (20-25 year life span, Fire Retardant)

Serge Ferrari, Seaman, Mehler, Naizil

Ask for a sample and see what you get and how fast you get it.

Let me know if I can help.

Customer Service and being able to touch and feel the fabric is a great first step.

Fabric Structure P’s

Today, the FabricArchitect looks at the letter “P”

  • point supported structure
  • patterns
  • PVC

Point Supported Structures

Point-supported structures are forms with a minimum of four points of attachment with either straight or curved edges that produce a clear span with no center mast.  The classic point-supported structure is the saddle shape or hypar.

Point-supported structures can have a variety of shapes depending on the number of anchor points and the position of the supporting elements, however, double curvature is essential.

Patterns

Computer patterning is the process of developing a two dimensional representation of a three- dimensional membrane surface. The patterns are created with compensation factors. Compensation factors are the reduction made to a cutting pattern to allow for the expansion of the membrane once in tension. In some cases, decompensation (addition made to the length of a piece of the membrane which was shortened by compensation) is required in order to meet certain geometric conditions such as fixed points where there is no access for tensioning. The panels are sized according to the width of the fabric being used.

PVC

PVC (polyvinylchloride) or vinyl coated polyester is the most common and cost effective membrane material for both temporary and permanent tension structures. The material is soft, pliable and less expensive than PTFE. It is available in a variety of types to meet a wide range of structural requirements. It has a minimum of stretch and shrinkage in a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions and the coating process prevents mildew, stain and streaking.

Most PVC fabrics will have some form of top coating applied to keep them looking new and clean. These topcoats can be acrylic solutions, polyurethane-acrylic solutions, PVDF solution coats or a PVF film lamination. Vinyl laminated polyester is primarily used for temporary structures while vinyl coated polyester is used for both temporary and permanent structures.

PVC material has a life span of 15-25 years and comes in a variety of colors and textures. This material is sealed using radio frequency (RF) equipment.

Ouch, “Q” comes next.